Leading Teams was delighted to hear that year 12 students at SEDA in Western Australia will be studying Team Work by Ray McLean as their English text in 2018.

We spoke to State Manager, Rocky Collins, about why they’ve chosen Team Work.

What made you choose Team Work?

At SEDA we contextualise everything through sport to engage our students. We’ve chosen Team Work as our English text for Year 12 next year because we can study language and written techniques for engaging audiences via a text that will resonate with the class.

At SEDA our classes stay together for each of their lessons throughout the year, so we encourage the students to see themselves as a team and to work together. We specifically look for texts that will marry our curriculum objectives with personal development and the sporting context.

How did you find out about Team Work?

I was aware of Leading Teams through footy, and I’ve read both of Ray’s books previously. Team Work struck me as great fit for what we were looking for.

What do you want your students to learn from Team Work?

Obviously this is an English class so they’ll be focusing on analysing the text. But we also seek to develop our students on a personal level at the same time and leadership and team work skills are really important.  Choosing Team Work as a set text will allow each class to focus on their leadership and individual development at the same time.

Team culture is important to us and to our students, so Team Work just ticks all the boxes.

Here’s Ray introducing the text for SEDA students.

About Team Work

There are no shortcuts to good leadership and effective teamwork, but diagnosing the problem is often the first step to improving team performance. Using candid case studies from teams who have implemented Leading Teams’ no-nonsense Performance Improvement Program, this book explains how the program can work for all kinds of teams, big or small, sporting or corporate.

Buy a copy of Team Work today

 

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